. L.B. For the purposes of the rule, conflict minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten. The conflict-free smelters and refiners used by electronics firms under the CFSP only source about 10% of 3T metals from inside the DRC and 15% from its neighbouring countries.

In 2020: 42% of companies initially determined that their conflict minerals may have come from the DRC or adjoining countries Our Code of Conduct for business partners encourages . . . in the [Covered Countries]." 20 Products will be considered "DRC conflict free" if, when the conflict minerals . Congress enacted Section 1502 of the Act because of concerns that the exploitation and trade of conflict minerals by armed groups is helping to finance conflict in the DRC region and is contributing to an emergency humanitarian crisis. Minerals Rule. Foster Company is committed to the highest standards of ethics and business conduct. Please enter a search value. We found that company inquiry results haven't changed much since 2015. There is both statistical and anecdotal evidence that the presence of precious commodities can prolong conflicts (a "resource curse"). Although Unisys does not source those metals directly, Unisys is committed to: 10. The Conflict Minerals Rule requires certain companies to report annually to the SEC a description of measures taken .

Key Terms. support MSC's efforts to identify the smelters and refiners that process conflict minerals used in our products and the countries and mines of origin of such conflict minerals. Section 1502 on conflict minerals of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act is a transparency measure, and one part of a comprehensive approach to Congo's challenges. Instead, companies bought minerals from the neighboring countries (Rwanda and Uganda) who would procure the minerals from DRC mines, passing them off as conflict-free, regardless of their actual origins. It greatly expands the list of regions companies should prioritize for due diligence, due to known existing human rights issues. It is expected that the Conflict Minerals Rules will reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the DRC and the other Covered Countries."Conflict Minerals" include gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, and wolframite, as well as their derivatives, tantalum, tin, and tungsten. Too many countries that are rich in natural resources are blighted by armed conflict, poverty and poor governance. With focus on the Automotive Group, we are asking direct suppliers to fill out the Conflict Minerals Reporting Template (CMRT) developed by the Responsible Minerals Initiative with detailed information on the smelting and mining operations in the countries where the minerals we use originate. . These countries are: Sudan, Central Africa Republic, Uganda, Congo Republic, Angola, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia and Angola. On January 1, 2021, the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation took full effect. The EU regulation covers tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold because these are the four minerals that are most often linked to armed-conflicts and related human rights abuses, so it makes sense to focus on them. The SEC rules define conflict minerals as 3TG metals, wherever extracted. There are concerns that the conflict minerals fund armed forces of the Covered Countries causing many deaths of their own people and infringement of human rights in the course of . 1 "Conflict Minerals" include Columbite-Tantalite (Tantalum), Cassiterite (Tin), Gold, Wolframite (Tungsten) and any derivatives from these materials. The conflict minerals reporting template (CMRT) is a free, standardized reporting template developed by the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) and is considered the industry standard reporting template for conflict minerals compliance.

A few other similar initiatives have been developed to ensure that minerals . The term conflict minerals, as defined by the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation, refers to the extraction of minerals that support, prolong, and cause conflicts in their originating countries. L.B.

The Conflict Minerals Rules define "conflict minerals" as tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold as well as the derivatives of cassiterite, columbite-tantalite and wolframite (these materials collectively referred to as "3TG" metals). Four common conflict minerals, clockwise from top left: coltan, cassiterite, gold ore, and wolframite. On January 1 st 2021, a new EU regulation for four conflict minerals came into effect. . LG Electronics has a policy that conflict minerals contained in our products shall not be derived from sources that finance or benefit armed groups. in the [Covered Countries]." 20 Products will be considered "DRC conflict free" if, when the conflict minerals . " Conflict minerals " means tin (cassiterite), tungsten (wolframite), tantalum (columbite tantalite or coltan), gold, or their derivatives, which originate in the covered countries. The intent of the provision is to deter through increased transparency of companies' sourcing practices the extreme violence and human rights violations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and neighboring countries funded by the exploitation and trade of . The list includes 208 regions from 27 countries. . A product is considered to be "DRC conflict free" if it "does not contain conflict minerals necessary to the functionality or production of that product that directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups . Schlumberger recognizes that there are serious .

Conflict materials by definition, are used to fund armed rebels and civil violence. Stopping sourcing . Covered countries are defined in Section 1502 as having an internationally recognized border with DRC and include Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The EU Conflict Minerals policy largely draws from Dodd-Frank 1502 but also shows more determination to promote transparent and sustainable trade with more high-risk areas included, not just the DRC and covered countries. Conflict resources are natural resources extracted in a conflict zone and sold to perpetuate the fighting. LG Electronics expects our suppliers to have in place policies and due-diligence measures to facilitate the sourcing of minerals that are "DRC conflict free". The Office of Threat Finance Countermeasures, in conjunction with other State Department bureaus and U.S. agencies, actively works to sever the links between mineral resources and conflict through government-to-government diplomatic efforts. While there are no changes expected at this time, if the State Department modifies its list of Conflict Minerals or covered countries, the SEC rule automatically follows suit. Tracking the source countries of conflict minerals is not an easy task. Companies must act responsibly by checking their supply chains and mitigating harms. The "Conflict Minerals" for purposes of the Conflict Minerals Rules are gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, and wolframite (including their derivatives, tantalum, tin and tungsten) and any other minerals designated by the U.S. Secretary of State in the future. determining whether conflict minerals originated in the covered countries: under the final rule, a company that uses a conflict mineral is required to conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry that must be performed in good faith and be reasonably designed to determine whether the conflict mineral originated in the covered countries or are Henkel Corporation RMI CMRT 6.21 (1.47 MB) Henkel undertakes due diligence to attempt to determine if any of the minerals contained in the raw materials we source for our products . In countries struggling with political instability, where governance for the mining sector is weak, the extraction of these minerals can be linked to violence, conflict and human rights abuses. What is the acronym 3TG? The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for example, supplies more than 63 per cent of the world's cobalt. The rule on conflict minerals focuses on the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") and surrounding countries, a central African region with vast mineral wealth, including reserves of conflict minerals, and surrounding countries. For many years, armed groups have fought to control mines within the DRC and smuggle minerals out of the region . A product is considered to be "DRC conflict free" if it "does not contain conflict minerals necessary to the functionality or production of that product that directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups . The Law. Passed in 2010 and implemented by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 2012, it creates a reporting requirement for all companies . The mine is now producing regular shipments and is viewed as the role model for establishing a secure supply of conflict-free minerals from the region.

The regulation also draws on well-established rules to help stem the trade in conflict minerals. The Securities and Exchange Commission requires companies to report on the origin of these "conflict minerals" used in their products. Inspired by the Dodd-Frank Act Section 1502 on US Conflict Minerals Regulation, the European law and its reporting framework align with the OECD due diligence guidelines for responsible mineral sourcing.The wider scope of the EU regulation means that impacted companies have to take a few extra steps to reach compliance. Countries rich in minerals such as cobalt, coltan, cassiterite, copper and gold are often marred by corruption, authoritarian repression, militarization and civil war. Realities on the Ground. European Union Conflict Minerals Regulation. We were one of the first organisations to reveal how minerals that bankrolled social and environmental harms ended up in our mobile phones, laptops and cars. The Conflict Minerals and covered countries in the rule align with those identified by the U .S. These so-called 'conflict minerals', such as tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, can find their way into our mobile phones, cars and jewellery. Countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo have fallen victim to rebels who use revenue from minerals such as diamonds, coltan and cassiterite to purchase arms and fuel conflict. What are conflict minerals? This conflict has been exacerbated by various groups fighting to control .

The Office of Threat Finance Countermeasures, in conjunction with other State Department bureaus and U.S. agencies, actively works to end the use of certain "conflict" minerals to fund violent armed groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) through government-to-government diplomatic efforts.The office also builds international support for due diligence guidelines intended to . "Conflict Minerals" is the term used to describe certain minerals such as gold, wolframite, casserite, columbite-tantalite and their derivative metals, which include tin, tungsten and . Conflict minerals are usually talked about in the context of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where a 20-year conflict between armed groups and the state has to mass murder, rape and other human rights violations. Foster Company supports the humanitarian goal of ending violent conflict in the DRC and surrounding countries and is committed to avoiding the use of "Conflict Minerals" in our products. Conflict minerals include: cassiterite (tin), gold, columbite-tantalite (tantalum), wolframite (tungsten), their derivatives and other minerals as determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and the surrounding nine covered countries (see map). State Department. 2. modifies its list of conflict minerals or covered countries, the SEC Rule automatically follows suit. Nicolas Cook, "Section 1502: Conflict . The 3TG minerals, along with the ores from which they originate, are known as conflict minerals* because it is believed that armed conflict, and related human rights abuses, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries (the DRC region) may be directly or indirectly financed by the trade in the 3TG minerals, which are mined . HanesBrands is committed to sourcing materials from companies that share our values regarding human rights, ethics and environmental responsibility. "Conflict-free"- means the product does not contain any 3TGs necessary to the functionality or production of that product that directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups in the Covered Countries or . More than 3 million people have been killed in the conflict. Under the Act, those minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten. While definitions vary between countries and associated legislation, conflict minerals are generally understood to include: columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); gold; or their derivatives, which . The EU Regulation, as agreed by the EU Institutions, is set to ensure sustainable sourcing for more than 95% of all EU imports of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, and is covered by due diligence provisions as of 1 January 2021. In the SEC rule, "DRC conflict-free" is defined as minerals that were extracted and did not directly or indirectly benefit armed groups in the covered countries. Section 1502 of this act requires certain public companies to provide disclosures about the use of specified conflict minerals emanating from the DRC and nine adjoining countries. The rule on conflict minerals focuses on the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") and surrounding countries, a central African region with vast mineral wealth, including reserves of conflict minerals, and surrounding countries. Flowserve will not knowingly procure raw conflict minerals from covered countries that are not deemed conflict-free from mines, smelters and refiners that produce the minerals used in our products. For many years, armed groups have fought to control mines within the DRC and smuggle minerals out of the region . For example, tin extracted in Canada, Russia or Argentina is considered a conflict mineral by definition. Conflict Minerals.

Companies still face challenges in determining the countries of origin of their conflict minerals. Lear must perform due diligence on, and make disclosures concerning its use of conflict minerals originating in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjoining countries. Conflict Minerals Regulation In politically unstable areas, armed groups often use forced labour to mine minerals.

Share prices drop for companies that source minerals from the DRC and adjoining countries, violate human rights, or provide ambiguous disclosures. The risk of human rights tainted tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold (3TG) entering the supply chains of tech firms is extending well beyond countries considered to be the traditional source of the . The office also builds international support for due diligence guidelines intended to help industry develop a responsible minerals trade from conflict . They then sell those minerals to fund their activities, for example to buy weapons. A new tantalum mine is being assessed to . More complex than a war, the fractious violence is often is . Alfa Laval Conflict Minerals Policy Statement. Ref: Inquiries on - Conflict Metals or Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010: Section 1502 - Conflict Minerals ("Dodd-Frank Act"). For many years, armed groups have fought to control mines within the DRC and smuggle minerals out of the region . Paving the way for the EU regulation in May 2017, the European . On December 17, 2020, the European Commission published the Indicative, non-exhaustive list of Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas under Regulation (EU) 2017/821. The rules and regulations require us to determine the extent to which our products contain Conflict Minerals originating from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and certain adjoining countries ("Covered Countries") by analyzing the products we manufacture and the raw materials and components we purchasethrough supply chain due . Conflict Minerals. The 3TG metals have become known as "conflict minerals" because much of it is sourced from the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") and adjoining countries (together, with the DRC, the "Covered Countries") where a decades-long civil war is being waged. All Lear suppliers are required to respond to information requests from Lear regarding the uses and sources of conflict minerals (tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold) in their . The Responsible Minerals Initiative ("RMI"), of which TTM is a member, supports this endeavor by . . Finally, the market incorporates the information in CMDs. The Act gave the Securities and Exchange Commission authority to seek more transparency in the supply chain from businesses that use any 3TG as a necessary part of . "Conflict Minerals" is the term used to describe certain minerals such as gold, wolframite, casserite, columbite-tantalite and their derivative metals, which include tin, tungsten and tantalum that are sourced from mines under the control of violent forces in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or the surrounding countries. European Union Conflict Minerals Regulation. Routinely request our direct material supplies to submit a report consistent with the Responsible Minerals Initiative . The rule on conflict minerals focuses on the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") and surrounding countries, a central African region with vast mineral wealth, including reserves of conflict minerals, and surrounding countries. Responsible minerals The global minerals trade has funded abuses and armed conflict for decades. Our Conflict Minerals program is addressed in our Supplier Code of Conduct, our Global Suppliers Terms & Conditions and our purchase order requirements. Countries Involved in the Illegal Trade of Conflict Minerals Mine Locations 1.Angola 2 .

Commonly used for 4 minerals (3TG): Tungsten, Tantalum, Tin, and Gold that are mined in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Expect our suppliers to supply materials to AMPCO METAL that are "DRC ConflictFree" and to adopt policies and management systems with respect to conflict minerals to ensure Conflict-Free supply chains. President and CEO. "3TG"- means tungsten, tantalum, tin and gold- the four minerals currently covered under the Conflict Minerals Rule.